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Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time

Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time


Solo exhibition for artist and creator Itzik Sujaz
Curator: Moshe Saidi


In the “Tower” gallery, 3 Daniel Frisch St., Tel Aviv


The solo exhibition by the artist Itzik Sogaz was created under the influence of the coronavirus and is now on display.


He says, “These days following the outbreak of corona disease we are experiencing one of the most challenging periods of humanity. A small virus has managed to spread all over the world in such a short time and it seems to be able to change the conduct of human culture in such a way that it will learn for many years to come.”


I’m on my way trying to sculpt (document) a point in time. “


FOMO – Is a social anxiety


Where someone is afraid to miss out on enjoyable experiences that others have. Itzik deals with the meaning of anxiety in the corona era, the anxiety of missing out and how it is expressed in the period that was forced on the human being and his coping with it.

Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time

Bullets speak, now and in time. Artistic certificates in clay, mesh and concrete.


A deep and poignant three-dimensional mirror. Reading in the newspaper. Material that shapes the spirit and a razor-sharp statement. There is variation in the material, but uniformity in the message and statement. Public speaking and concern.

From the words of the curator of the exhibition, Moshe Saidi:


“My friend the creator Itzik Sujaz is not in a hurry to take a stand in his first exhibition but is content to put the issues on the agenda. Language and material are familiar to him and he is wonderful to express, warn and inspire, like waking up late. His sculpted words touch us on all levels – ages and dimensions.

Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time


“This exhibition is a sign of things to come, because our problems have not ended and we will be comforted by talking, writing and doing the material…And if these messages are received by us “


Sujaz sculptes in the workshop of the artist Moshe Saidi in Kibbutz Kfar Menachem, and delves into the ever-current topic:


“In my works I try to convey my perception of the relationship between man and the environment.


“The works reflect my perception of the reality in which we live, sometimes in a critically surrealistic way and sometimes by a reflection of reality as I perceive it. On the way we exploit natural resources destroying and polluting the world we live in by overuse of various plastic products.

Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time


“The second issue I give expression to is the impact of technological development on man. The growing use of technology is developing as an alternative to face-to-face personal communication. There is no attempt here to criticize the widespread use of cell phones, social networks, software like Zoom or any other technology, but to document the period in which we live.


“In my view, the role of the artist is to document the period in which he lives in order to preserve the sense of emotion and change for future generations.


“We live in a very dynamic period in which the rate of population growth, accelerated technological development and globalization make the world small and accessible, and here are the works that focus on global issues.”

Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time


Moshe is one of the oldest and most respected artists and sculptors in the State of Israel, who beyond his captivating personality and his ability to transfer his experience and skills in carrying out large projects, he is also a teacher by grace.

With its help, I was able to express my feelings and emotions and at the same time also dare to experiment with working with materials that allow large works to be made in concrete and mesh.

Corona Shadow Art Sculpture: A Point In Time


Closing of the exhibition: end of August
Visiting hours at the exhibition: Sunday-Thursday 09: 00-20: 00
Friday: 09: 00-14: 00

The artist on Facebook:
Itzeak Sujaz

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